Picture of horses in field in front of traditional Gypsy wagons

New resource launched to support health professionals in reducing health inequalities for people living with frailty

Today, we are pleased to share, ‘Reducing Health Inequalities for People Living with Frailty: A resource for commissioners, service providers and health, care and support staff’.

We know that populations experiencing inequalities are more likely to experience premature frailty and that those with the greatest need often also have the greatest difficulty in accessing and receiving appropriate care and support.

This resource shares practical recommendations and examples of how commissioners, service providers and health, care and support staff can successfully overcome barriers to healthcare for people at greater risk of frailty, including people experiencing deprivation, people who are homeless, people experiencing substance misuse, people with learning disabilities, LGB&T people, people with mental health needs, people from Gypsy and Traveller communities, and vulnerable migrants.

The resource was developed by Friends Families and Travellers with Homeless Link, The Association of Mental Health Providers, CHANGE, Collective Voice, FaithAction and MESMAC. To explore how services can better serve groups at risk of premature frailty, we asked people about their experiences accessing health and care services, and developed simple, practical recommendations for commissioners, service providers, and health care and support staff.

Diagnosis and management of frailty can play a pivotal role in the prevention of poor health, but current clinical practice often only focusses almost exclusively on people aged 65 and older. This report shows that assessment for frailty based on patient need, rather than age, could provide welcome opportunities for early interventions in populations experiencing premature frailty.

The report offers key insights on how health and care services can work in collaborative, holistic and inclusive ways to reduce health inequalities for people living with frailty, and offer all patients the support needed to manage the condition long-term.

The resource was commissioned by the Department of Health and Social Care, Public Health England, NHS England and NHS Improvement as part of the Voluntary Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) Health and Wellbeing Alliance, which aims to bring the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector’s voice and expertise into national policy making.

Speaking about the resource, Sarah Mann, Director of Friends Families and Travellers said:

“Everyone in society should be given the greatest possible opportunity to stay healthy and maintain resilience throughout their lives. Frailty is a powerful predictor of poor health, yet groups experiencing the greatest inequalities, who are also at the greatest risk of premature frailty, are often missed by efforts to identify and manage the condition long-term. The recommendations in this report offer an opportunity to redress this and to support health and care services to strive towards healthy ageing for all”.

 

Notes for Editor

About Friends, Families and Travellers (FFT)

Friends, Families and Travellers is a leading national charity that works on behalf of all Gypsies, Roma and Travellers regardless of ethnicity, culture or background.

About the VCSE Health and Wellbeing Alliance

The VCSE Health and Wellbeing Alliance is a partnership between voluntary sectors and the health and care system to provide a voice and improve the health and wellbeing for all communities.

Media Contact

Sami McLaren, Communications Officer

Tel: 07436 228910 Email: [email protected]

Relevant Resources

‘Reducing Health Inequalities for People Living with Frailty: A resource for commissioners, service providers and health, care and support staff’. View the resource.

‘7 Ways to Reduce Health Inequalities for People Living with Frailty: For commissioners, service providers and health, care and support staff’. View the infographic.

Share this page:

Page last updated: Oct 20, 2020 @ 2:41 pm

Sign up to our Newsletter

Scroll to Top