A-Levels & GCSE Results Summer 2020: What to do if you have concerns or questions about your grades

Background

Exams and assessments were cancelled this year due to coronavirus (COVID-19) but most students will still receive their grades in time to move on to further study or employment. You may still be able to do this even if your grade isn’t what you wanted.

If you find that the result you were expecting is not what you received, you should speak to your school or college. Only your school or college can submit an appeal on your behalf.

This information has been adapted from Gov.uk and will be updated as and when new information is released.

To view the ‘Student guide to post-16 qualifications results: summer 2020’, click here.

The deadline for appeals is 17 September 2020.

PLEASE NOTE: As of 17th August 2020, students will be awarded their centre assessment for this summer – this is the grade their school or college predicted – or the grade originally given, whichever is higher.

I think there might have been a mistake when my school or college submitted my centre assessment grade

You can ask your school or college to check whether it made an error when submitting your centre assessment grade or your position in the rank order.

If your school or college does think it made a mistake, it can submit an appeal to the exam board, but it must be supported by clear evidence that an error had been made.

I think the exam board might have made a mistake when calculating my grade

Your school or college can appeal to an exam board on your behalf if it believes the exam board used the wrong data when calculating grades or incorrectly communicated the grades calculated.

You should discuss this with your school or college.

I don’t agree with the centre assessment grade that I was given by my teacher

Your school or college submitted the grades it believes you were most likely to achieve if exams had gone ahead.

You can’t appeal your grade because you don’t agree with the centre assessment grade or rank order position submitted by your school or college. You should first speak to your school or college.

It’s important that you understand on what basis you can and can’t appeal your results when deciding your next steps. Only your school or college can submit an appeal on your behalf.

If you’d like an opportunity to improve your grade, you can choose to sit exams in the autumn series instead.

If you have concerns about bias, discrimination or something else that suggests that your school or college did not behave with care or integrity when determining your centre assessment grade or rank order information, see below.

I don’t agree with the statistical standardisation model, and now I think my result is wrong

The ‘statistical standardisation model’ is used to make sure grades across different schools and colleges are of a consistent standard. Your school or college can’t appeal your grade on your behalf because it does not agree with the standardisation model.

Your school or college can appeal to the exam board on your behalf if it believes the exam board used the wrong data when it calculated the centre’s
grades. If you’d like an opportunity to improve your grade, you can choose to sit exams in the autumn series instead.

What if my school or college won’t submit an appeal on my behalf?

If your school or college won’t submit an appeal to the exam board on your behalf, it must have a process in place for you to ask for a review of that decision.

You should first raise this with your school or college. If you wish to complain, you should speak to the exam board for further guidance.

I think I could have done better if I had sat my exams

You can’t appeal your grade because you think you would have done better in your exams. If you would prefer to take exams you can do so in the autumn series.

I’m entitled to reasonable adjustments due to my disability, and I don’t think this was taken into account when determining my centre assessment grade

If you are concerned that reasonable adjustments weren’t taken into account when determining your centre assessment grade or rank order, you should raise these concerns directly with your school or college.

If you have evidence of serious malpractice on the part of your school or college, it may be appropriate to bring those concerns directly to the exam board instead.

I think my result has been affected by wrongdoing such as discrimination or bias

If you have concerns about bias, discrimination or any other factor that suggests that your school or college did not behave with care or integrity when determining your centre assessment grade or rank order information you should first raise these concerns with your school or college.

Your school or college must have a procedure in place to deal with such complaints.

If you have evidence of serious malpractice on the part of your school or college, it may be appropriate to bring those concerns directly to the exam board initially instead. Where there is evidence, exam boards are required to investigate allegations as potential malpractice or maladministration.

Triple lock for students ahead of A level and GCSE results

The Government announced that students could accept their calculated grade, appeal to receive a valid mock result, or sit autumn exams to ensure the achievements of young people are recognised.

Students who would like to use a valid mock result will be able to do so through the appeals process, with individuals notifying their school or college who will provide evidence of their mock results to their exam board.

 

If you require advice or support at this time, you can phone our helpline on 01273 234 777. Please note that in line with Government advice, we have closed our office, however, if you leave a voicemail outlining what you need support with and your contact details, our advice and casework team will respond to your call. Alternatively, you can send us a message using our Contact Us form or get in touch through FacebookTwitter or Instagram.

Top